lohgan:

This sums up my life pretty well.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

Okay so like. Here’s the thing Night Vale fans should be doing.

Stop pretending the Night Vale fandom has any potential of becoming a safe space, ever. Stop pretending it is one. Stop pretending it can ever be one. Stop pretending that pockets of safe spaces can exist in this all- scorching, all-burning hellhole. Don’t let folks of color let their guard down. Come up and front with the announcement this fandom is fucking OVERRUN with racists. It’s not only extremely difficult to make a safe space on the internet operate in any capacity on a platform like tumblr (where the community is tag-based and unmoderated), this false notion only serves for the whites present in the fandom to backpat themselves over some bizarre notion of creating an inclusive space. While other whites, usually in droves, dive right into said safe space and start shitting and pecking at all and sundry. Don’t let folks of color get their guard down. Come up and front and tell them this fandom is notorious for drumming out people of color, tell them this fandom is notorious for whitewashing characters of color, tell them this fandom has a history for sending people of color violent death threats and goading them into suicide for talking up about racism. Let them know exactly what kind of space they will be participating in because their emotional and psychological safety is worth so much more than your white-ass self-congratulatory “safe space” nonsense. Tell them blogs have been made to silence people of color, one of them named white-cecil-only. Tell the queer people of color that a blog called fucknocecilos exists, the mod of which uses racist slurs in addition. Come up and front and tell them they will be participating in a fandom that finds every wiggle room to whitewash, silence, dismiss, threaten death to and belittle people of color, and if they ask you how that’s even possible with a progressive canon such as Welcome to Night Vale remind them that it’s exactly like reading the comments on a progressive and popular article.

No, better yet, remind them that sometimes media is created that caters to and is inclusive of a particular audience or demographic and the very opposite decides to hijack the shit out of it for their own ends.

Like racists dicking all over WtNV. Or you know, bronies. They should be familiar with bronies.

This is what you should be doing, unless you’re too busy being complicit and enjoy the false sense of security and heightened sense of grandstanding this fandom offers you. Because tackling this situation is obviously going nowhere and the number of people being vocal about this rampant problem of racism is only growing smaller in numbers by the day. Either get your shit together and sort this nonsense out and COLLECT YOUR TRASH AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY POSSIBLE or don’t expect people of color to be placated with your half-assed liberal activist nonsense and don’t lead them into letting their guard down.

InternLeland, who received thirteen death threats in his inbox while at the ER and decided fuck this goatshit nonsense.

(a message sent to me by former tumblr user internleland. please feel free to reblog.)

(via boondoggleprospect)

Dear National College Health Survey,

sea-tidesofthesoul:

Emotional abuse is not always spoken.

Emotional abuse can be silence.

It can be the complete and utter lack of communication that makes you afraid to break that silence, that makes you feel invisible, that makes you doubt everything you are, because if you were something better he’d talk to you, right?

Just because there was no yelling, no name-calling, no ridicule, does not mean that it was not emotional abuse.

Just saying.

“Learn to say ‘no’ without explaining yourself.”

(via j-term)

No.

(via lies)

(via marykatewiles)

neenya:

"They cited the ever-widening night sky as the impetus for this decision."
— Episode 22: The Whispering Forest
neenya:

"They cited the ever-widening night sky as the impetus for this decision."
— Episode 22: The Whispering Forest

neenya:

"They cited the ever-widening night sky as the impetus for this decision."

— Episode 22: The Whispering Forest

(via nightvalequotes)

rosslynpaladin:

autisticadvocacy:

Image is of a text message from Did you know to ASAN as on an iPhone or iPad interface. The text from Did you know reads: “Autism $peaks yearly media budget is $10,238,115. The reply from ASAN reads “That could buy 14,226 iPads to let nonverbal Autistics speak for ourselves!

Below the texts is an Autistic Self Advocacy Network logo, with i”April is autism acceptance month” in smaller text below the logo.

BOOM. “Apply water to burned area.”

#AutismSpeaksDoesn’tSpeakForME

(via cardcarryingcynic)


Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet
↳ F → feminism & representation"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

(via corrupter-of-words)

verdigrisfemme:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Accurate commentary is accurate. This is why I love Elementary.
verdigrisfemme:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Accurate commentary is accurate. This is why I love Elementary.
verdigrisfemme:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Accurate commentary is accurate. This is why I love Elementary.
verdigrisfemme:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.
Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.
1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.
2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.
3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”
You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Accurate commentary is accurate. This is why I love Elementary.

verdigrisfemme:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Accurate commentary is accurate. This is why I love Elementary.

sea-tidesofthesoul:

Just finished Avatar with the rest of the Awesome Foursome. We determined that the Avatar characters line up really well with the Avengers, as follows:

Katara is Captain America, as both are optimistic and make inspirational speeches.

Toph is Iron Man, as both develop new technologies and make badass metal suits.

Aang is The Hulk, as both are generally peaceful folk who sometimes get all ragey and turn into massive destructo-beings.

Suki is Black Widow, as both are super badass, have short reddish hair, and are more-or-less normal, in that they don’t have superpowers/bending.

Sokka is Hawkeye, as both have crazy geometry-analyzing skillz and are wiseasses.

Zuko is Thor, as they both have issues with their younger siblings.